C2 Swan-Band Filter (15nm ) – O-III parallel

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C2 Swan-Band Filter (15nm ) – O-III parallel

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€ 79.00 Price excl. German VAT tax (19%): € 66.39

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  • Comet filter for the two brightest C2 emission lines at 511 and 514nm (called "Swan-Band") in the gas tail and gasplume of comets, respectively
  • Blocks the adjacent OIII line, which does not predominantly occur in the tail of comets
  • CMOS optimized for increased contrast
  • Front-Reflex-Blocker™ hard coated and planeoptically polished – with sealed coating edges (Life-Coat™)
  • Blackened edges all around

The SwanBand filter is indeed a very special filter with central wavelength at 512 nm and ≤15nm half-width - for the first time without any O III transmission. It is therefore suitable for a variety of unusual applications some of which require further investigation, whether as an "O III parallel filter" to better remove stars from the image, or as a solar filter in a previously inaccessible section of the spectrum. We would be pleased about your experience reports also apart from the comet photography.

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€ 79.00 Price excl. German VAT tax (19%): € 66.39

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What's the actual size of your 2" filters in "mm" with and without frame/ring? What step down adapter is suggested from a 52 mm to "-- mm"?
Question by: Waqas Ahmad on Oct 10, 2016 7:54:00 PM | 1 Answer(s)

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184
What are the threads and pitch of your 1.25" and 2" filters?
Question by: Anders G. on Sep 20, 2017 12:55:00 PM | 1 Answer(s)

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C2 Swan-Band Filter (15nm ) – O-III parallel

Contrast gain for comet hunters

The Baader C2 SWAN-Band-Filter with ≤ 15 nm Half-Band-Width isolates the two C2 lines at 511 and 514nm.

These two emission lines, named Swan bands after their discoverer, dominate the spectrum of a comet's gas tail in the visible range. The filter allows only the light from the two carbon bands to pass through and, among other things, blocks the ubiquitous stray light, similar to a nebula filter in deep-sky observation. Structures in the gas tail thus become clearer even under good observing conditions. At the same time, it completely blocks the OIII line at 501nm and below, which other Swan-Band filters allow to pass. This allows for even higher contrast, and comets with gas tails can be distinguished even better from those dominated by a dust tail (and where a SWAN filter provides only a small contrast enhancement). For ambitious comet observers, a SWAN filter is part of the basic equipment.

Just in time for the introduction of the new C2 Swan-Band filter, a bright comet, comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF), offered itself as a test object. Our customer Andreas Bringmann was one of our first testers - see more under TAB Review

This image was taken from the big city and with an almost full moon. You can clearly see the amount of "doubly ionized carbon" (the carbon excited to glow radiates only in the wavelengths 511 nm and 514 nm ) emitted by the comet. The filter shows the complete extension of the ion cloud around a comet:

C-2022E3_ZTF passes Hassaleh in Auriga (Baader C2 Swan-Band 15nm), imaged with Celestron EdgeHD 11", Takahashi FSQ-85ED | Moravian Instruments G3-16200 MK I, ZWO ASI6200MM Pro | 10Micron GM3000 HPS & Baader C2 Swand-Bad Filter, 2" (15nm), © A. Bringmann

The Baader SWAN-Filter has got all the advantages of the CMOS-optimized Baader filters:

  • Increased contrast, matched for typical CMOS quantum efficiency and s/n ratio
  • Reflex-Blocker coatings, for largest ever freedom from halos, even under most adverse conditions concerning aux-optics
  • Identical filter thickness to existing standards, with utmost care for parfocality
  • Blackened edges all around, with filter-lead-side-indicator in the form of a telescope-sided black outer rim, to additionally eliminate any reflection due to light falling onto the edge of a filter, making additional front-masks obselete
  • Each filter coated individually, with sealed coating edge (NOT cut out of a larger plate with coatings left exposed, read more)
  • Life-Coat™: evermore hard coatings to enable a non-aging coating for life – even in a most adverse environment

Baader Blogpost:
New CMOS-optimized Baader Filters



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Wiewo 33/02/2024 03/02/202408:54
  • Rating:
Genau das braucht man für Kometen mit Gasschweif!
OIII Filter, welche die C-Linien inkludieren gibt es genug. Endlich einmal ein Filter der die OIII Linie aussperrt! Speziell in Himmelsbereichen mit OIII Nebeln im Hintergrund ist das definitiv ein Vorteil.
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Váradi Nagy Pál 189/07/2023 09/07/202319:29
  • Rating:
A decent little monochromator for my Sun
Well, some of you may already know me as the lunch break solar photographer, so I couldn't resist this filter. I knew what I was expecting: a monochromator pretty much like the Solar Continuum, maybe with a bit more mottling, maybe a bit more faculae, but otherwise nothing spectacular (no G-band, no MgII-bands, not even prominences as I did manage to capture one with the 5.5 Hydrogen Beta filter) just continuum.

Allow me to show two photos, of the Sun on 2023-09-07, ND3.8, 102/714ED, Swan filter and ASI 533MM-Pro. One is the "as it came out" version, the other one has its details slightly enhanced via local contrasts.
  • It does its job
  • No issues so far
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Thanks for sharing this interesting use of our C2 Swan-Band Filter!
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Uwe Pilz, Fachgruppe Kometen 232/08/2023 21/08/202317:54
  • Rating:
Engbandiger, kontrastreicher als Lumicon
Swan-Band-Filter wurden bislang nur von Lumicon produziert. Baader hat einen Filter herausgebracht, der sich von den Lumicon-Filtern unterscheidet.

Lumicon hat 25 nm Halbwertsbreite und erfasst die [OIII]-Linie mit, ist also auch als [OIII]-Filter zu benutzen. Der Baader-Filter ist nur 15 nm breit und blendet diese Linie aus. Dieser Fakt allein wird wohl an einem Kometen nichts machen, wenn er nicht gerade vorm Zirrusnebel steht :) Eine geringere Halbwertsbreite heißt aber höherer Kontrast.

Ich habe beide Filter an C/2023 E1 (ATLAS) verglichen. Komet Atlas ist derzeit (Mitte August 2023) noch um 9m5 hell und damit von einem dunklen Standort aus etwas für zumindest größere Ferngläser. Der Komet ist recht groß, 6'.
Der Himmelshintergrund war mit dem Baader-Filter deutlich dunkler, das Bild ansprechender. In etwa wie der Vergleich von UHC (ohne S) und [OIII] an Nebeln. Das war von den Bandbreiten her auch zu erwarten.
Der Kometenschweif emittiert möglicherweise andere Wellenlängen als der molekulare Kohlenstoff der Koma. Welche Auswirkungen dies hat, muss ich noch ergründen. ATLAS hat ja keinen wahrnehmbaren Schweif.

Der Filter wurde von Baader prompt geliefert, nur 2 Tage.
  • Besserer Kontrast, unterdrückt die Lichtverschmutzung effektiver
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Yannick Akar 187/07/2023 07/07/202308:56
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Images with a normal LPS luminance filter (Hutech IDAS LPS-P2) and single images with the C2 Swan band filter
The images were taken on January 29, 2023 directly from the outskirts of Mannheim, Germany. The test series consisted of exposures with a normal LPS luminance filter (Hutech IDAS LPS-P2) and single exposures with the Swan band filter.

The comparison between the luminance and swan-band images clearly shows the true power of the 15nm Swan-Band filter over a full-spectrum luminance filter. The doubly ionized carbon from Comet C2022 E3 (ZTF) is clearly visible in the images taken with the Swan-Band filter. Due to environmental influences such as light pollution, these are completely absent in my luminance images.

By combining the Swan-Band and luminance filters, I was not only able to work out fine details down to the nucleus of the Comet in the subsequent image processing, but also the carbon that was excited to glow became clearly visible in the final image with the help of the Swan-Band filter.

Acquisition details: C-2022 E3 (ZTF) – Imaged with Celestron RASA 11“ / QHY268M / iOptron CEM60 / Baader C2 Swan-Band Filter (15nm) 2“ & Hutech IDAS LPS-P2 2“
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A. Bringmann 187/07/2023 07/07/202308:20
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C2 Swan band (OIII parallel) 15nm - contrast gain for comet hunters
Just in time for the test of the new C2 filter a bright comet offered itself as a test object.

Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF) from 8.FEB.2023:
https://www.astrobin.com/3rxr9y/
https://www.astrobin.com/full/3rxr9y/0/

This image was taken from the big city and with almost full moon.
You can clearly see the amount of "doubly ionized carbon" (the carbon excited to glow radiates only in the wavelengths 511 and 514 nm ) were emitted by the comet.

Also a only mag 16.2 faint C/2022 U2 (ATLAS), which is overtaken by the mag 5.8 bright C/2022 E3 (ZTF), could be photographed:
https://www.astrobin.com/5drx2q/
https://www.astrobin.com/full/5drx2q/0/

The precise 10Micron GM3000 HPS mount followed the fainter comet here.
And so the motion in front of the background stars and at the same time the motion of the bright comet is visible in this image.

It would be highly interesting to make a comparison exposing a comet through both an OIII filter and the new C2 filter. Thus, with the larger carbon gas cloud, one could deliberately highlight the inner nucleus of the comet.

Since the C2 filter allows only the green carbon transmission to pass through, the dust tail illuminated by the sun could be highlighted very clearly with the new 20 nm H-alpha filter.

I wish all ambitious comet hunters a lot of fun with the high contrast gain of gas comets when using the new C2 filter!
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Mr. Andreas Bringmann was one of our first testers of the new C2 Swan band filters (15nm ) - O-III parallel.

Many thanks for your kind review! Unfortunately it is not possible to render links in a product review, we have linked them again here below:

Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF), February 8th, 2023:
https://www.astrobin.com/3rxr9y/
https://www.astrobin.com/full/3rxr9y/0/

Also a only mag 16.2 faint C/2022 U2 (ATLAS), which is overtaken by the mag 5.8 bright C/2022 E3 (ZTF), could be photographed:
https://www.astrobin.com/5drx2q/
https://www.astrobin.com/full/5drx2q/0/
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