Author Archives: Michael Risch

Michael Risch

Michael has been interested in astronomy and spaceflight, since he saw the last moon landing as a child. In 1981, he became a member of the Association of Amateur Astronomers in the Saarland and, as a member of the board, accompanied the establishment of the Peterberg Observatory. As co-founder and first webmaster of www.astronomie.de, he contributed numerous ideas and reports on astronomical and spaceflight topics to the first German astronomy portal. He has been practicing planetary, comets, solar, deep sky as well as TWAN style photography, and has been on many long distance trips, among others to 7 total solar eclipses. As a long-time science editor, he has led "Northern lights and stars" trips to the Arctic Circle. Michael has published many of his own photos and articles in professional journals and has written chapters for the books chapters for the books Fotoschule (Photo School) and Extremfotografie (Extreme Photography) with his colleague Martin Rietze for "Color Foto".

At Baader-Planetarium he is part of the observatory project team and is booked for lectures in Germany and abroad. Furthermore, he is an expert consultant for observatories, domes, high end mounts, telescopes and much more.


  • New Instruments for the „Bruno H. Bürgel“ Observatory in Sohland

    The "Bruno H. Bürgel" Observatory in Sohland, Germany was built by two amateur astronomers in the 1950s. It is named after a "worker-astronomer" who proved nearly a hundred years ago that a formal education is not necessarily required to conduct scientific work and achieve success. Today, the observatory is still operated by a society of dedicated amateur astronomers who take great joy in sharing their passion for astronomy with both young and old during guided tours. They also emphasize personal, hands-on experience, particularly in astrophotography, under the dark skies of Lusatia. As a result, there has long been a desire to acquire a modern telescope setup that can also be controlled via the internet and from the observatory's lecture hall. Discover this observatory also on...
  • Observe comet 12p/Pons-Brooks now     

    New comets with unusual behavior are constantly making the headlines. However, an "old acquaintance" is currently approaching with powerful show effects. Comet 12p/Pons-Brooks has an orbital period around the sun of 71 years and was observed probably in China around 700 years ago. It is currently approaching its closest point to the sun again, which it will reach on April 21st, 2024. It will be closest to the Earth on June 2nd, 2024 before disappearing into the outer reaches of the solar system for another 71 years. As it slowly heats up while approaching the sun, the comet has shown several outbursts of brightness in recent months, which experts explain as ice volcanism (cryovolcanism). During this process, ice heats up under the surface, sublimates (becomes...
  • Observe comet ZTF (C/2022 E3) in binoculars and telescope now!

    The new year begins with a new comet that may even be visible to the naked eye Comet C/2022 E3 ZTF is coming close to the Sun for the first time in certainly 50,000 years, and on Thursday, January 12, it will come about as close to our central star as the Earth. It has been tracked by amateur and professional astronomers for several months now. It has now about 7th magnitude, so it is observable with common binoculars and even smaller telescopes. However, the currently three-degree-long plasma tail and a short dust tail fan shown in recent photos will not yet be seen visually with small optics. But that will change soon. The well-known comet photographer Michael Jäger sent us an impressive animation and...
  • Amateur Astronomers take a look through the Cloud Cover of Venus with our SLOAN Filters

    Amateur astronomers successfully explore Venus with Baader SLOAN Filter Even today, amateur astronomers can still contribute to scientific research. For example, our new photometric filters now open another window into the depths of the atmosphere of the planet Venus. Venus amazes researchers. It is as big as the Earth, but extremely different from it. Venus is a hellish world with temperatures of up to 450 degrees at the surface. The reason for this is an enormously dense atmosphere, which generates a pressure that only exists at an ocean depth of 900m on Earth. This atmosphere consists of 90% carbon dioxide, a dense layer of sulphur dioxide clouds makes it opaque to us. There are only a few narrowly limited wavelengths in which a space probe...
  • David vs Goliath – 2.3m AllSky Dome at the Large Binocular Telescope

    On the 3221m tall Mount Graham in Arizona stands an observatory like no other, because it consists of two huge optical telescopes on a single mount under an enormous protective structure: the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO). Next to it, a downright tiny Baader 2.3m AllSky dome has now been installed. Discover the 2.3M Baader AllSky Dome and additional images also on our observatory world map The "Large Binocular Telescope" (LBT) has two mirrors with 8.4m diameter each, which together form the largest optical telescope in the world. It collects as much light as an 11.8m telescope. However, due to the distance between the mirrors, the resolution of a 22.8m mirror is achieved, which can also be used sensibly thanks to adaptive optics. Several German...
  • Installation of a 4.2m Highspeed Dome on Teide/Tenerife

    Our installation team had the task of installing one of our HighSpeed domes on the Teide in Tenerife in May 2021. The Teide is a unique natural wonder. The 3,715-metre high "sleeping" volcano is the highest peak in Spain. The national park located on the mountain is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and offers an impressive crater landscape with cooled lava flows and other volcanic phenomena as well as endemic animal and plant species. At an altitude of almost 2,400 metres, there are many astronomical observatories, including – due to the excellent seeing during the day – one of the largest solar telescopes in the world. Discover the 4.2M Highspeed Dome also on our observatory world map Our team was accommodated in the "Astronomers' Hotel"...
  • First light for SSC's satellite tracking ground station

    In collaboration with Baader Planetarium, Planewave and Andor, the Swedish Space Cooperation (SSC) SSC has been developing a ground station for satellite tracking over the past 1,5 years. A couple of days ago, a first successful test run took place at Baader Planetarium's factory. The development is part of SSC’s Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program with the aim at contributing to both safer and more sustainable use of near-Earth space, as the number of objects keeps increasing at a rapid pace. The aim of the tests was to ensure the station to be as efficient as possible in generating highly sophisticated SSA data, by combining the highest quality individual components. A 3.5m Allsky Dome from Baader Planetarium was chosen as the protective structure. This Dome...
  • New instruments: Telescopes and mounts for Rodewisch Observatory

    The Rodewisch Observatory in Saxony/Germany has a long history dating back to the beginnings of space travel. The observatory founder Edgar Penzel was the first person outside the former Soviet Union to photograph the first satellite Sputnik 1 in 1957. With a wire ring that he bent around a school globe, he was able to roughly determine the time of the satellite's appearance over Rodewisch and photograph "the Sputnik". The photos sparked great interest at home and abroad at that time, especially of course in the Soviet Union. This was the foundation for decades of visual and photographic satellite tracking as well as astronomical observation of the sky in Rodewisch. After the first German cosmonaut Sigmund Jähn was launched into space in 1978, the Rodewisch...
  • Deep-Sky Astrophotography with the FlipMirror II star diagonal

    Instruction Manual: Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal The Baader FlipMirror II (BFM II) in action The Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (#2458055 , € 228,-) is not only an accessory for "experts" but also a useful tool that makes the work of every amateur astronomer – especially the astrophotographer – easier.  First and foremost, the BFM II is designed to fully replace your standard star diagonal so that you can continue to observe as normally with any good star diagonal. But with the BFM II you also have the freedom to create your own photo system immediately – or step by step – and have it ready for immediate use on the telescope.This saves a lot of time and nerves. We would like to introduce...
  • Planetary Imaging with the FlipMirror II Star Diagonal

    Instruction Manual: Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal Using the Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (BFM II) at the Telescope The Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (#2458055 , € 228,-) is not only an accessory for professional users, but much more: It is a helpful tool for every amateur astronomer – especially for astrophotography. First of all, the BFM II is designed to completely replace your standard star diagonal, so that you can keep observing as usual, just like with every good star diagonal. But the BFM II gives you much more options. You can create – from the beginnig, or step-by-step – your own system for photography and keep it always ready-for-use at your telescope. This will save you a lot of time and nerves....

1-10 of 22

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3