Author Archives: Alexander Kerste

About the author

Alexander Kerste

Alexander Kerste is a studied biologist and works as a freelancer as an author, consultant and translator. After his studies and the publication of the Kosmos Starchart-Set in 2004, he was a regular freelancer for Astronomie Heute and the yearbook Der Himmel for the Spektrum-Verlag in Heidelberg. He is in charge of the Beginner courses on www.Astronomie.de and is a voluntary active member in the Robert-Mayer-Observatory since 1993. Since then, he has published a number of books on Celestron-Telescopes as well as Digiscoping and Astrophotography. One of his books on Astronomy with binoculars is also freely available at freebook.fernglasastronomie.de. In addition he supervises the Northern lights and star tours from Hurtigrute – these were also published in a travel guide, further articles can also be found on his blog kerste.de.


  • NEW: Baader SunDancer II H-Alpha Filter – Test Review

    I was lucky enough to be able to "play" with one of the first SunDancer II H-alpha filters and see what it is capable of. Even though I am not one of the most experienced H-alpha observers, I have been able to observe the sun with the two H-alpha telescopes of the Observatory in Heilbronn/Neckar again and again for more than 20 years. These are a 20/20 H-alpha filter by Wolfgang Lille with 0.8Å on the 150/2250 refractor (which complements a classical prominence filter), and a Lunt LS-60 telescope. I freely admit that I find the concept of the Lunt convincing, especially for public observatories: a complete telescope with which nothing can go wrong. It's foolproof, which is especially important in an club where many...
  • Spectroscopy with the FlipMirror II Star Diagonal

    Instruction Manual: Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal Using the Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (BFM II) at the Telescope The Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (#2458055, € 195,-) is not only an accessory for professional users, but much more: It is a helpful tool for every amateur astronomer – especially for astrophotography. First of all, the BFM II is designed to completely replace your standard star diagonal, so that you can keep observing as usual, just like with every good star diagonal. But the BFM II gives you much more options. You can create – from the beginnig, or step-by-step – your own system for photography and keep it always ready-for-use at your telescope. This will save you a lot of time and nerves. In...
  • Adjustment options of the FlipMirror II star diagonal

    Instruction Manual: Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal Using the Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (BFM II) at the Telescope The Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (#2458055, € 195,-) is not only an accessory for professional users, but much more: It is a helpful tool for every amateur astronomer – especially for astrophotography. First of all, the BFM II is designed to completely replace your standard star diagonal, so that you can keep observing as usual, just like with every good star diagonal. But the BFM II gives you much more options. You can create – from the beginnig, or step-by-step – your own system for photography and keep it always ready-for-use at your telescope. This will save you a lot of time and nerves. In...
  • Using the FlipMirror – The Correct Working Distances

    Instruction Manual: Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal Using the Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (BFM II) at the Telescope The Baader FlipMirror II Star Diagonal (#2458055, € 195,-) is not only an accessory for professional users, but much more: It is a helpful tool for every amateur astronomer – especially for astrophotography. First of all, the BFM II is designed to completely replace your standard star diagonal, so that you can keep observing as usual, just like with every good star diagonal. But the BFM II gives you much more options. You can create – from the beginnig, or step-by-step – your own system for photography and keep it always ready-for-use at your telescope. This will save you a lot of time and nerves. In...
  • The disc of Mercury near the upper conjunction, captured with the Baader APO Travel-Companion 95/580

    Our customer Jörg Schoppmeyer sent us this unusual picture: a circular Mercury, shortly after the upper conjunction and only 1.8° away from the Sun!     Mercury is traditionally a difficult object to observe. The reason: The small planet is always close to the Sun and can be seen with the naked eye only shortly after sunset or before sunrise when it is at maximum distance from the Sun. Legend has it that even the great astronomer Johannes Kepler never saw Mercury with his own eye - but Kepler did not have a modern telescope with accessories from Baader Planetarium... On August 18th, 2020, Jörg Schoppmeyer pointed his BAADER APO 95/580 CaF2 Travel Companion (#2300095, € 3850,-) at Mercury. Since the small planet was only...

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