Product Information

  • Why choose UFC Quickchange-Frontfilters with DSLR-Cameras?

    Info about using quickchange-frontfilters with the UFC in combination with DSLR-cameras There are no monochrome DSLR-cameras on the market, so a filter holder (e.g. the Baader-UFC) may seem quite useless for DSLR imaging, but if you take a closer look, there are indeed some interesting use-cases. Many owners of DSLR-cameras remove the complete UV/IR-blocking filter and use this simple way to improve the sensitivity especially for H-alpha – but because of the costs, they decide not to add a new blocking filter with increased H-alpha-transmission. But as a result, you have to find another way to block the IR- and UV-parts of the spectrum so that they will not decrease the image quality. You can use the UFC to mount such a UV/IR-cut filter in front of the camera - and to quickly replace it with another filter, without touching the camera. Narrowband filters are not perfectly suited for a...
  • Baader-UFC (Universal Filter Changer) – the ever-growing filter chamber

    UFC 2" Filter slider (#2459112) with mounted Filter - showing both sides UFC D50.4mm Filter slider (#2459113) with mounted Filter - showing both sides Application Image: UFC 50x50 Filter slider (#2459114) with mounted Filter - showing both sides >> View all UFC-Products << The Baader-UFC is the priceworthy answer to an ever growing problem. New camera-models come to market in ever increasing speed. Spacers between telescope and camera don´t support the correct distance or are subjected to torsion due to their flimsy design and heavy cameras. And the owner may want to change the telescope - or use several OTAs, but does not want to purchase new filters and filter sliders all the time. The Baader-UFC is a (seemingly) simple answer to a complex problem. It is made in the typical Baader-way, trying to connect each and everything in the most elegant and flexure-free manner. The filter chamber (UFC-Base) is...
  • Optical tube lengths of Clicklock mirror diagonal

    Recently we received the following questions on our 2" Clicklock Diagonal Mirror and wanted to answer including the below illustrations for other customers: According to image below is the optical path mentioned in technical data (112mm for #2956100 and 109mm for #2956100Z) measured along optical axis from point A to B or point A to C? what is the dimension from point B to C? Can 2” barrel (at point A) be removed from #2956100 and exchanged with another accessory (is it available?) to change the diagonal to #2956100Z (M68x1 thread)? Please note below our answer and adjusted graphic: The optical path of 112mm is measured A to C. The lightway from A to B would be ~71,5mm. Please note that the final endpoint of B is 3,5mm outside of the prism body (as illustrated in the below graphic), it looks just like point A in your drawing The Dimension from B...
  • Perfect coma correction with Baader-MPCC – but how to adapt eyepieces?

    We received the following question and found it important to write an extensive answer for other customers. QUESTION: I purchased the Hyperion Zoom and the MPCC Mark III. Can you tell me how to adapt the eyepiece to the coma corrector? I also want to use other eyepieces. How do I know the right distance between fieldstop position and the MPCC? ANSWER: It is easy to produce an adjustable 1¼" eyepiece adapter for the Baader-MPCC coma corrector, offering a variable optical length from 49 to 64 mm, by using the following two parts: Baader focusing eyepiece clamp 1¼"/T-2 (item no. 2458125 / # 8a) Baader VariLock 20-29 mm T-2/T-2 adapter (item no. 2956929 / # 25Y) Combining these parts on top of the MPCC T-2-thread and rotating both adapters into the shortest optical length will provide an optical distance of 49 mm for an fully inserted eyepiece with 1¼" barrel....
  • Implementation of UV/IR Cut Filter - Test Report

    Shooting the moon through a normal Baader UV/IR Cut Filter in comparison with the Baader IR Passfilter >>>> In the near infrared spectral range atmospheric disturbances (seeing conditions) are much more less than in the visible spectral range. Images taken in the near infrared light are often sharper than images taken in shorter wavelength. Special the moon (and the sun also) are nice targets shooting images with the IR Passfilter due to their brightness. All the following images was taken in the same night within a time interval of only 45 minutes (decreasing moon). The seeing was during the whole imaging session moderate. Image details: standard Celestron C14 in prime focus with a Celestron SkyRis camera 445 mono. Telescope location: Onjala Lodge/Namibia. Stacking each 144/1.200 frames and Waveletfiltering with AviStack 1.8, final imaging processing with Photoshop CS 2. All image processing was made absolutely identical. The animation left shows the...
  • Baader BBHS ® reflective properties

    Exclusively available on Baader Sitall Ceramic Mirrors and on selected Baader prism Star Diagonals: BBHS® reflection coatings predominantly are being utilised on our highest quality grade 2" BBHS® Sitall Stardiagonals (#2456115 – incl. black housing and 2" ClickLock clamp) as well as on the BBHS® T-2 Sitall Stardiagonal (#2456103) - where the housing features a male and female T-2 thread - for shortening the optical path with bino use, and to offer the utmost in adaptation variability as well as much more light throughput than with any conventional 1 1/4" star diagonal. BBHS® stands for Broad Band Hard Silver. When applied onto our Sitall (zero expansion glass-ceramics) substrates, these multiple deposited layers of hard silver are being sealed by a set of dielectric layers to achieve long term durability. With this advance in coating technology our BBHS® coating lifetime equals that of a high quality AlSiO2 coating, matching the durability...
  • The Baader L-RGB-C CCD Filter

    A brief introduction to the function of CCD Filters Without modern RGB-filters, the CCD-revolution in astronomy would never have happened. It´s these filters that allow schools and universities do do meaningful imaging in science and education under totally light polluted skies from the midst of major cities. Unlike terrestrial objects, astronomical objects shine in discrete emission lines. For this reason, any RGB-filter design with gently raising and falling slopes on either side of the transmitted spectral region generally is undesirable. The stars themselves obey to the laws of physics and shine by their stellar temperature colour - with a smooth, wide spectrum. This richness of colours can be covered nicely when adding an L-filter into the imaging process. However - shades and colour hues such as in earthly objects are not available when imaging the sharply defined emission spectra of deep sky objects. For this reason  the slopes on RGB filter curves ought to be produced extremely steep for each...
  • Baader Narrowband Filter – why?

    A brief introduction to the function of narrow band filters. Narrowband filters have revolutionized CCD photography for the “amateur astronomer” in the past decade in incredible ways. It was now possible for small telescopes, even in light polluted city areas, to photograph faint nebula – and generally the universe surrounding us in the incredible variety of coloured “gaseous areas” – in hours of exposure time, and by combining the exposure of each colour of the various emission lines – even the faintest nebula were suddenly registered despite strong light-polluted skies. Suddenly, the smallest backyard telescope can collect the real light of gaseous nebula to produce image results there were otherwise only reserved for telescopes with several meters of light-collecting surface without any time limit. The narrow emission area and spectral half width of these filters ensures that only the light emitted or reflected from the gaseous nebula literally “punches” through,...
  • The Baader Astro T-2 System™

    Baader Astro T-2 System™ Component Chart For over 30 years we have focused on the Astro T-2 thread system (M 42 x 0.75 mm); virtually every telescope manufacturer must offer this thread far ahead of the focal point of his instrument, such a universal T-ring (for DSLR cameras) can be connected. The only exceptions are (still) Russian equipment, there the thread diameter is the same, but the pitch is still 1mm per revolution - rather than 0.75mm! Therefore, we offer among other things a "Russians adapter". At only 7mm additional optical length it can allow so many Russian lenses or telescopes to be compatible with an international Astro T-2 (M 42 x 0.75mm) connector! For the sake of better recognition mostly are marked. See marking small 'a' or small 'i' in the respective indication! "a"; identifies an external thread (male); or, if Ø sign which a diameter, "i"; - a...
  • Observation: Minor planet Clausbaader (5658)

    Clausbaader on 09.09.2015 at 18:15 and 18:55 UT From Dipl.-Ing. Wolfgang Paech – Onjala- and Chamäleon Observatory, Namibia For this year's longer stay in Namibia we planned to photograph the minor planet (5658) Clausbaader. It had a high altitude in the evening sky, close to Saturn. The series is intended as a small tribute to Mr. Claus Baader, the founder of Baader Planetarium in Mammendorf, who was one of the leading personalities in the field of amateur astronomy and public education in the last century in Germany. Read more under Company History. The imaging instrument - the 150mm Zeiss APQ refractor and a Celestron C14 on a Astrophysics 1200 GTO mount in the 4 meter dome. The images were captured at the 150mm Zeiss APQ refractor at Onjala Observatory and an "ancient" SBIG ST2000-XM. After completion of our "Project Pluto" - the experiment to take Pluto with a classic 2 inch telescope...

1-10 of 11

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2