Additional Information

  • Team Baader at the "Great American Eclipse" 2017

    For years our colleagues Martin Rietze and Michael Risch have been hunting for the next solar eclipse in the most remote places in the world. See e.g. our blog posts on AstroSolar.com: 2015: Solar Eclipse Adventure in Svalbard Martin Rietze and Michael Risch from Baader Planetarium – both solar eclipse chasers – have again traveled to the event and brought us impressive images and videos. Svalbard is one of the few islands where the path of totality on March 20th, 2015 crossed land. Its 1300km from North Pole Our chances for good weather were somewhere around 50% so it was more or less gambling flying there to see the Total Solar Eclipse... [br] 2016: Solar Eclipse on the Molucca Islands After last year´s amazing eclipse in arctic regions with -25 degrees Celsius a Team from Baader Planetarium (Martin Rietze, Michael Risch) experienced an extreme contrast at this year´s eclipse which...
  • Concerning fear about counterfeit Baader AstroSolar Viewers and Film coming up in the USA

    Don't miss out to read customers comments and our detailed replies below.[br] Update August 17th, 2017: Quote below from news article AAS spokesman on Amazon recall, fake products, safe eclipse viewing Amazon screwed up. I've been telling them that for weeks and as the problem gets worse, the person there stopped responding to me. I think they're overwhelmed. They know they screwed up. They're trying to do the best they can. They don't know what they're doing. Dr. Rick Fienberg – American Astronomical Society (AAS) press secretary Regarding Solar Viewer AstroSolar® Silver/Gold Baader Solar Viewer AstroSolar® Silver/Gold are CE / ISO certified and absolutely safe: they conform to and even exceed the transmission requirements DIN 12312-2:2015 for eye safety On Sat, Aug 12, Amazon sent an email to all customers who had purchased a wide variety of solar products (glasses or viewing cards) from several of our US-dealers that the...
  • An experience report on the new Baader Telecentric System TZ-3 and the Research Grade (RG) Telecom­pressor (TC) 0.4

    An experience and observation report on the new Baader Telecentric System TZ-3 and the Research Grade (RG) Telecom­pressor (TC) 0.4 for solar observation in the H-alpha light with SolarSpectrum filters download the complete review (pdf) Introduction Successful H-alpha-observations of the sun with narrow-band line filters from the manufacturers   “SolarSpectrum” and / or "DayStar" require an almost parallel beam of light with a focal ratio of approx. f/30 directly in front of the filter, otherwise the filter will not work properly. This is not so easy with today's fast optical systems, which work around f/7. Such an opening ratio can be achieved either by masking (reducing) the front lens opening or by parallizing the optical beam with a "telecentric system" (TZ). * TZ: See also the supplement at the end of the report. My "solar telescope" is an AstroPhysics refractor with an aperture of 155mm and a focal length of 1.085mm,...
  • Avalon Instruments - Fast Reverse Mounts

    Avalon Mounts: Portable mounts for astronomical imaging Goal: Total reliability The Avalon LineAR and M-Uno Fast Reverse Mount are equatorial mounts designed for astronomical imaging. With a load capacity of 20-25 kg (44 – 55 lb) the mounts are unrivaled in their construction, qualitiy and price, and are sutiable for both visual and photographic observations. The M-Zero offers the same technology. With a load capacity of 8-13 kg, the low weight and high quality of this mount make it the ideal companion for travelling observers and astro-photographers. The M-Zeta, with a load capacity of 20 kg - 20+10kg in Dual Dec. Mode, an altazimuth Single-Arm mount, continues Avalon's tradition of cutting edge design and top quality performance. The main goal of Avalon was to bring the perfect mount for astro-imaging onto the market, with no plays and vibrations, assuring the highest precision and total reliability on the field. Every astroimager dreams of a...
  • Apochromatic Triplet Objective: Why oil-spaced lenses?

    Why an oil-spaced triplet-lens? The first successful experiments with oil-spaced triplet-lenses were probably done by Wolfgang Busch from Ahrensburg, who had several discussions about this with Carl Zeiss Jena, back in the days of the German Democratic Republic. Even then, this technique was far superior to the standard technics like air-spaced or cemented lenses. But it was hard to keep the joining medium inside of the lens, because of insufficient synthetic oils and many other reasons. Because of this, the lens could freeze or dry out. It took Zeiss more than ten years of research to solve these difficulties and present the first APQ-lens. Besides Zeiss, only Astro-Physics and TEC were able to produce long-lasting oil-spaced lenses. It takes some tricks and knowledge to keep the oil (if the fluid can still be called oil) inside of the lens – at least over a long period of time with always-changing...
  • Information on backorders/release of 17.5 mm Morpheus® 76° widefield eyepiece

    For the Morpheus® 17.5 mm we have gone a very long way to end up with a perfect product. It definitely took many more iterations than we had in our planning. The Morpheus® eyepiece design at 76° of field does sound very moderate when compared against the far greater advertised apparent fields (and Cost!!) of those 82°, 92° and 100° eyepieces presently offered. The optical design is at it´s very and absolute limits. Image of one of the many Morpheus® 17,5mm prototypes - incl. new rubber eyecup with built-in M43 metal thread However - what we try to do here is really, matching the most natural (and sharp, non-distorted) widest field of view that a human eye can take in without rolling the eyeball around - while making the rim of the field disappear. It is the famous "floating in space effect" that only comes up in the brain when...
  • The CDK Optical Design

    CDK 20" Astrograph The CDK [Corrected Dall-Kirkham] telescope is based on a new optical design developed by Dave Rowe. The goal of the design is to make an affordable astrographic telescope with a large enough imaging plane to take advantage of the large format CCD cameras of today. Most telescope images degrade as you move off-axis from either coma, off-axis astigmatism, or field curvature. The CDK design suffers from none of these problems. The end result is a telescope which is free from off-axis coma, off-axis astigmatism, and curvature of field, yielding a perfectly flat field all the way out to the edge of a 52mm image circle. This means pinpoint stars from the center out to the corner of the field of view. The design is a simple and elegant solution to the problems posed above. The CDK consists of three components: an ellipsoidal primary mirror, a spherical secondary...
  • Celestron and 10Micron at CEDIC Conference in Austria

    From 10. - 12. of March 2017, the annual CEDIC '17 (Central European Deepsky Imaging Conference) takes place in Linz, Austria in the "Ars Electronice Center". Christoph Kaltseis and the CEDIC Team have ceated a highly interesting program of different lectures and workshops. Amongst other Professional Astronomers such as Yuri Beletsky (Chile) and Adam Block (USA) will be there, as well as Jerry Bonnell (NASA, APOD), Baader Planetarium represents the brand 10 Micron with a presentation on Saturday Marcht 11th, from 11:45 to 12:05 am. Unfortunately, the lecture program has now been booked, the limited CEDIC passes are all sold out. You can only register on a waitlist for the event, in case some participants do not show up. However, the access to the foyer is open to everyone, where we welcome everyone at our booth, who does not participate in the conference. The GM 1000 HPS and GM 2000 HPS mounts are exhibited together with a Celestron...
  • Why choose UFC Quickchange-Frontfilters with DSLR-Cameras?

    Info about using quickchange-frontfilters with the UFC in combination with DSLR-cameras There are no monochrome DSLR-cameras on the market, so a filter holder (e.g. the Baader-UFC) may seem quite useless for DSLR imaging, but if you take a closer look, there are indeed some interesting use-cases. Many owners of DSLR-cameras remove the complete UV/IR-blocking filter and use this simple way to improve the sensitivity especially for H-alpha – but because of the costs, they decide not to add a new blocking filter with increased H-alpha-transmission. But as a result, you have to find another way to block the IR- and UV-parts of the spectrum so that they will not decrease the image quality. You can use the UFC to mount such a UV/IR-cut filter in front of the camera - and to quickly replace it with another filter, without touching the camera. Narrowband filters are not perfectly suited for a...
  • New accessories for H-alpha solar observation / imaging

    A competely equipped M68 H-alpha Telescope - with all recommended accessories Our sun is a fascinating target even when the solar activity is low - given that the telescope aperture can be increased sufficiently. When equipped with a heated SolarSpectrum H-alpha filter, telescopes from 80mm aperture to 280 mm aperture will show incredibly faint, rapidly changing structures. A SolarSpectrum filter with matching D-ERF-filter and telecentric beam accessories will turn almost every telescope into a highest resolution H-α-telescope. These heated H-alpha filters are manufactured for observatories and ambitious amateurs who want to utilize the aperture and resolution of their existing large telescopes for detailed imaging and monitoring faintest solar features, instead of just taking a quick look at our closest star with a comparably small objective aperture. SolarSpectrum filters have no central obstruction and the whole H-alpha stack of optical elements inside is precision heated with a autocorrecting thermo-controller. There is...

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