Zusätzliche Informationen

  • APOD: Trifid nebula taken with PlaneWave CDK 17 on Rooisand Observatory

    Impressive image, taken with PlaneWave CDK17, chosen as APOD (2017 October 20) Convince yourself of the high image quality of the combination CDK 17 and TV Reducer  In spring of 2013, the turnkey "Rooisand Observatory" in Namibia, a 3.2 meter Dome, received latest equipment and technology: A new telescope combination consisting of an Astro-Physics  GTO 1600 mount equipped with a Planewave CDK 17", a Zeiss APQ 130 / 1000m and a TEC APO 110 FL together with a wide range of optical and photographic accessories 25 x 600 seconds with ALccd8 L, Telescope: Planewave CDK17 with TeleVue 0.8x Reducer, Image processing: Nebulosity, Regim, Photoshop CS, © by Franz Hofmann + Wolfgang Paech For a comparison with the size with the Moon please click here. © by Franz Hofmann + Wolfgang Paech The Trifid Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius is one of the absolute highlights in the sky. The combination of red emission...
  • APF-R : Absolute Point of Focus

    What is APF-R The image-sharpening process APF-R was designed and implemented by Christoph Kaltseis over the last years. The basis is a simple, but important question: What does a really sharp picture look like? APF-R delineates this step in image processing in a new way. Numerous processes claim to master this topic, but in all cases, compromises have to be made. Each image is dependent on numerous factors, especially in astrophotography. Christoph Kaltseis' motivation was to get the maximum out of each picture. On the way to an APF-R picture, it is important to make the first step as thorough as possible. This first step is crucial: It determines what details will be visible in the final image.[br] Please note: The images shown on this page are low-resolution GIF-images, which should only demonstrate the sharpening effects. Original images as .PSD files can be found on www.cedic.at/apfr. Visual Components: Sharpness is...
  • Unsere Neuheiten September 2017

    nach dieser langen Sommerpause mit der Sonnenfinsternis in USA freuen wir uns, Ihnen wieder einige Neuheiten präsentieren zu dürfen. MPCC III V-1 Koma-Korrektor 2" Set - SET: Visuelle und Fotografische Version Der einzige Koma Korrektor für Newton-Teleskope, der die Brennweite des Teleskops nicht verlängert und der das Bildfeld nicht verkleinert! Neu gerechnete, größere Linsen für völlig vignettierungsfreie Aufnahmen bis f/3.5. Höchste Schärfeleistung über das ganze Bildfeld Phantom Group™ multivergütet, für höchste Transmission und Reflexfreiheit Visuelle & Fotografische Version bestehend aus: 2" Koma Korrektor Mark III fotografisch #2458400A Okularklemme 1¼" auf T-2, mit Drehfokussierung (T-2 #08A) #2458125 VariLock 29 arretierbare T-2 Verlängerungshülse 20 – 29 mm mit Spannschlüssel (T2 #25Y) #2956929 Optional empfohlen: Hyperion / Morpheus 2" Finetuning Stellring #2958027 Hinweis: Dieses Set ersetzt das bisherige Set #2458402 für visuelle und fotografische Anwendung des MPCC Mark III. Das alte Set bestand neben dem MPCC aus diversen Ringen - die optische Länge...
  • Team Baader at the "Great American Eclipse" 2017

    For years our colleagues Martin Rietze and Michael Risch have been hunting for the next solar eclipse in the most remote places in the world. See e.g. our blog posts on AstroSolar.com: 2015: Solar Eclipse Adventure in Svalbard Martin Rietze and Michael Risch from Baader Planetarium – both solar eclipse chasers – have again traveled to the event and brought us impressive images and videos. Svalbard is one of the few islands where the path of totality on March 20th, 2015 crossed land. Its 1300km from North Pole Our chances for good weather were somewhere around 50% so it was more or less gambling flying there to see the Total Solar Eclipse... [br] 2016: Solar Eclipse on the Molucca Islands After last year´s amazing eclipse in arctic regions with -25 degrees Celsius a Team from Baader Planetarium (Martin Rietze, Michael Risch) experienced an extreme contrast at this year´s eclipse which...
  • Concerning fear about counterfeit Baader AstroSolar Viewers and Film coming up in the USA

    Don't miss out to read customers comments and our detailed replies below.[br] Update August 17th, 2017: Quote below from news article AAS spokesman on Amazon recall, fake products, safe eclipse viewing Amazon screwed up. I've been telling them that for weeks and as the problem gets worse, the person there stopped responding to me. I think they're overwhelmed. They know they screwed up. They're trying to do the best they can. They don't know what they're doing. Dr. Rick Fienberg – American Astronomical Society (AAS) press secretary Regarding Solar Viewer AstroSolar® Silver/Gold Baader Solar Viewer AstroSolar® Silver/Gold are CE / ISO certified and absolutely safe: they conform to and even exceed the transmission requirements DIN 12312-2:2015 for eye safety On Sat, Aug 12, Amazon sent an email to all customers who had purchased a wide variety of solar products (glasses or viewing cards) from several of our US-dealers that the...
  • An experience report on the new Baader Telecentric System TZ-3 and the Research Grade (RG) Telecom­pressor (TC) 0.4

    An experience and observation report on the new Baader Telecentric System TZ-3 and the Research Grade (RG) Telecom­pressor (TC) 0.4 for solar observation in the H-alpha light with SolarSpectrum filters download the complete review (pdf) Introduction Successful H-alpha-observations of the sun with narrow-band line filters from the manufacturers   “SolarSpectrum” and / or "DayStar" require an almost parallel beam of light with a focal ratio of approx. f/30 directly in front of the filter, otherwise the filter will not work properly. This is not so easy with today's fast optical systems, which work around f/7. Such an opening ratio can be achieved either by masking (reducing) the front lens opening or by parallizing the optical beam with a "telecentric system" (TZ). * TZ: See also the supplement at the end of the report. My "solar telescope" is an AstroPhysics refractor with an aperture of 155mm and a focal length of 1.085mm,...
  • Avalon Instruments - Fast Reverse Mounts

    Avalon Mounts: Portable mounts for astronomical imaging Goal: Total reliability The Avalon LineAR and M-Uno Fast Reverse Mount are equatorial mounts designed for astronomical imaging. With a load capacity of 20-25 kg (44 – 55 lb) the mounts are unrivaled in their construction, qualitiy and price, and are sutiable for both visual and photographic observations. The M-Zero offers the same technology. With a load capacity of 8-13 kg, the low weight and high quality of this mount make it the ideal companion for travelling observers and astro-photographers. The M-Zeta, with a load capacity of 20 kg - 20+10kg in Dual Dec. Mode, an altazimuth Single-Arm mount, continues Avalon's tradition of cutting edge design and top quality performance. The main goal of Avalon was to bring the perfect mount for astro-imaging onto the market, with no plays and vibrations, assuring the highest precision and total reliability on the field. Every astroimager dreams of a...
  • Apochromatic Triplet Objective: Why oil-spaced lenses?

    Why an oil-spaced triplet-lens? The first successful experiments with oil-spaced triplet-lenses were probably done by Wolfgang Busch from Ahrensburg, who had several discussions about this with Carl Zeiss Jena, back in the days of the German Democratic Republic. Even then, this technique was far superior to the standard technics like air-spaced or cemented lenses. But it was hard to keep the joining medium inside of the lens, because of insufficient synthetic oils and many other reasons. Because of this, the lens could freeze or dry out. It took Zeiss more than ten years of research to solve these difficulties and present the first APQ-lens. Besides Zeiss, only Astro-Physics and TEC were able to produce long-lasting oil-spaced lenses. It takes some tricks and knowledge to keep the oil (if the fluid can still be called oil) inside of the lens – at least over a long period of time with always-changing...
  • Information on backorders/release of 17.5 mm Morpheus® 76° widefield eyepiece

    UPDATE November 17th, 2017: We regret that again a lot of time has passed since our last comment. We hereby confirm that the first production batch is almost finished and delivery will start latest in January 2018. Thank you for your continued patience. For the Morpheus® 17.5 mm we have gone a very long way to end up with a perfect product. It definitely took many more iterations than we had in our planning. The Morpheus® eyepiece design at 76° of field does sound very moderate when compared against the far greater advertised apparent fields (and Cost!!) of those 82°, 92° and 100° eyepieces presently offered. The optical design is at it´s very and absolute limits. Image of one of the many Morpheus® 17,5mm prototypes - incl. new rubber eyecup with built-in M43 metal thread However - what we try to do here is really, matching the most natural (and...
  • The CDK Optical Design

    CDK 20" Astrograph The CDK [Corrected Dall-Kirkham] telescope is based on a new optical design developed by Dave Rowe. The goal of the design is to make an affordable astrographic telescope with a large enough imaging plane to take advantage of the large format CCD cameras of today. Most telescope images degrade as you move off-axis from either coma, off-axis astigmatism, or field curvature. The CDK design suffers from none of these problems. The end result is a telescope which is free from off-axis coma, off-axis astigmatism, and curvature of field, yielding a perfectly flat field all the way out to the edge of a 52mm image circle. This means pinpoint stars from the center out to the corner of the field of view. The design is a simple and elegant solution to the problems posed above. The CDK consists of three components: an ellipsoidal primary mirror, a spherical secondary...

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